It’s not all-inclusive, but definitely interesting. There were many more takeaways from the researcher’s work including demographic trends and budgeting for tips; here are some that weren’t included in the chart that I found interesting about other professions:

  • Apparently no one tips flight attendants, and if you do, you’ll probably receive free drinks thereafter.
  • Golf caddies say that golfers tip better when they play better, but they always tip the best when it’s happening in front of clients.
  • Tattoo artists expect $10-20 on a $100 job and $40-60 on a $400 job, but they get nothing from 30% of people.
  • massage therapist expects a $15-20 tip and receives one 95% of the time—about half of a massage therapist’s income is tips.
  • whitewater rafting guide said he always got the best tips after a raft flipped over or something happened where people felt in danger.
  • Strippers not only usually receive no salary, they often receive a negative salary—i.e. they need to pay the club a fee in order to work there.

Do things, tell people.

According to Carl Lange, these are the only two things you need to do to be successful, which he (very well) defines as taking advantage of personally interesting opportunities. Matt Swanson wrote a follow-up post with the reminder that telling people about what you do can come in the form of writing, of blogging. I absolutely agree that sharing what you do, what you have a passion for, with other people opens doors; I have found this true in my life with my paid job, side gigs, hobbies, friendships, and invitations to happenings I wouldn’t otherwise be privy to. Nobody wants to listen to a boastful, overly self-confident jerk, but people generally respond well to learning of sincere personal successes. Lesson: Don’t be afraid to share your passions.

Do things, tell people.

Phenomenal approach to giving charitably. I was able to benefit from Doris Buffett’s gift to Louise Sawyer’s class at Tufts University, and am thrilled to hear that Louise and Doris have grown this into something bigger: a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) where participants learn about giving and then give. Watch the video (it’s cute and descriptive) and then learn more on the Learning by Giving website

The issues are complex, and there’s no magic bullet. But there are strategies that have demonstrated progress and promise. We believe that the way to move forward is to empower and engage communities, foster collaboration, and provide the tools to implement change. With our new Healthy Food & Community Change initiative, the Illumination Fund aims to inspire healthier communities.

Laurie M. Tisch, President, Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund

I’m very excited about this new initiative and the conversation surrounding it.

What’s your vision to make your community healthier?

Bringing Policy to the Table: New Food Strategies for a Healthier Society

imageThis morning, we’re launching the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy at Teachers College, Columbia University and the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund’s Healthy Food & Community Change Initiative. The conference, Bringing Policy to the Table: New Food Strategies for a Healthier Society, features an incredible lineup of participants who hold positions in public office, philanthropy, nonprofits, and health entities. 

Want to learn more? The event is over capacity, but join us from the comfort of your computer! Tune into the livestream beginning at 8:45am, and tweet with us using #tcfood

Editorially, I’ve worked hard on this event, and I think it will feature fantastic conversation and ideas. Very worth joining in, or at least sharing with a friend or two!

Monopoly players around the kitchen table think the game is all about accumulation. You know, making a lot of money. But the real object is to bankrupt your opponents as quickly as possible. To have just enough so that everybody else has nothing.

Richard Marinaccio, the 2009 U.S. national Monopoly champion

via The Meaning of Monopoly: From American socialism to German hyperinflation to worldwide vulture capitalism, the strange and shifting lessons of a favorite board game.

Interesting take.

Question: If this is indeed the object, what personality, traits, or demographic background might a good monopoly player tend to have?