New online resource talks taxes in plain English.

There’s a new website in town talking taxes. TaxHelp.org recently launched and has more than 150 free resources about United States taxes. Tis the season to check out resources like their General Guide to Taxes. I used to write my own simple guide to taxes, but I’m less in the know now and happy to share this equally readable and more reliable and up-to-date resource.

With just over a month to file, now’s the time to read up and efile if you haven’t already.

New online resource talks taxes in plain English.

Is Connectivity A Human Right?

via Facebook:

Today, only 2.7 billion people are online — a little more than one third of the world. That is growing by less than 9% a year, but that’s slow considering how early we are in the internet’s development. Even though projections show most people will get smartphones in the next decade, most people still won’t have data access because the cost of data remains much more expensive than the price of a smartphone.

Facebook has presented a “rough plan” for bringing access to 5 billion more people. I’m not sure about Facebook’s plan, but I do think connectivity introduces important access to information and growth opportunities to people (among many, many other things). In that sense, and in the same way that good health and healthcare is something that I consider a right (in addition to your standard food, clothing, and shelter), yes, connectivity is a right.

What do you think; is connectivity a right? And how do Facebook’s argument and plan hold up?

Is Connectivity A Human Right?

Philanthropy Fashions: What’s here to stay, and what’s just a trend?

Read my guest post from the Communications Network blog. Here’s an excerpt:

Just as wearing animal prints is not right for everyone (and certainly not for me!), not every industry trend fits every organization. Big Data is certainly out there, but foundations would be prudent to think about how to “make it their own” before jumping on the bandwagon. I would argue, however, that going a little outside of your comfort zone, be it with a loud print or a deep dive into an opportunity data set, is good. Data sets like these offer a way to assess and contextualize your current funding priorities, and can even provide a new angle through which you can share your grantees’ impact in local communities. In a time when data and communications are simply inseparable, the potential for surprising and positive results is huge. And, just think of what you’ll learn along the way.

(Un)Related note: anyone want to go into a side business of making kitchy tshirts for the nonprofit sector? I’m feeling good about it.

Philanthropy Fashions: What’s here to stay, and what’s just a trend?

What’s Your Slavery Footprint?

This provocative site was shared by a design consultant in a meeting this week. Yes, the design of the site is quite interesting, but the content of the site is what stood out most to me. Spend 10 minutes taking the survey; it’s very illuminating. 

What’s Your Slavery Footprint?

Do things, tell people.

According to Carl Lange, these are the only two things you need to do to be successful, which he (very well) defines as taking advantage of personally interesting opportunities. Matt Swanson wrote a follow-up post with the reminder that telling people about what you do can come in the form of writing, of blogging. I absolutely agree that sharing what you do, what you have a passion for, with other people opens doors; I have found this true in my life with my paid job, side gigs, hobbies, friendships, and invitations to happenings I wouldn’t otherwise be privy to. Nobody wants to listen to a boastful, overly self-confident jerk, but people generally respond well to learning of sincere personal successes. Lesson: Don’t be afraid to share your passions.

Do things, tell people.